Thoughts inspired by MY GRANDMOTHER ASKED ME TO TELL YOU SHE’S SORRY

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This is the third book I’ve read by Fredrik Backman. Not sure if this or A Man Called Ove is my favorite.  This one is story with lots of characters, which gives me hope for the book I’ve written that all is not lost. It’s main character is a child, but every character is a rich part of the story.

“…. because the people who reach the end of their days must leave others who have to live out their days without them.” — Frederick Backman

There is death in this story, but it it necessary for the story, just like in our lives. I am living out my days without a number of people who I wish were till here. I wish Cathy was here because her sense of adventure and love of music matched mine. I wish Debbie was here to leave me long, drawn out messages on voicemail. I wish Betty was here to enjoy watching me eat Key Lime pie and to tell us that “Larry says Hi!” And that Larry was here to say Hi and listen because he was always interested in everybody. I wish Charlie was here to teach E how to fish.

I wish Mamaw was here so I could ask her about what happened in 1938. I wish Great-Aunt Marie was here because where she was love was. And I’d even like to hear her burp again. I wish Dad was here to teach his great-grandkids all his nonsensical sayings. I wish Mom was here for so many reasons, I can’t even begin. So I’ll just say she was the one who always asked how Loretta was doing. And she would have liked Ruby just as much.

So I live out my days without them. I take Ruby now on my adventures and listen to lots of music with my husband. I think of Betty every time I have Key Lime anything. I’ve reached out to other relatives, some of whom I only recently met, to ask about 1938 and many other things. My brothers and I carry on with Dad’s sayings, and Mom’s jokes. But my voicemail still stays pretty empty.

 

Throwback Thursday – Another Era

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I like this picture, but I’m not sure why.  I know there is a story in it but I don’t know that story. So, in my mind I think about the possibilities.

What I DO know:

The man on the left is someone named Cliff Richardson. The woman is Susie, my grandfather’s sister. The man on the right is my grandfather, a man of mystery to me.

The men are both holding cigarettes. They are all dressed up; my grandfather in uniform. They are standing on a railroad track, but you can also see a fence in the background. So this must have been near a house, perhaps near a town.

What I don’t know:

This list could go on and on. I know nothing about my Great Aunt Susie. I don’t know why my grandfather left his first family. I have no idea who Cliff Richardson is. I don’t know where the picture was taken, but highly suspect somewhere in Georgia.

I hope one day to unravel a bit more of the unknown.